fbpx

PRINT ISN'T DEAD-OUR STORY

‘Future Human – Print isn’t Dead’ is devised to reduce isolation, improve individual mental health, increase well-being, engage participants in learning new skills and exploring ideas in a safe creative setting. This is a pioneering project that uses the meditative processes of printmaking and creates space for participants to engage with others, communicate ideas and work individually and as part of a group.

Building on our previous work with Ann Donnelly from NI Screen’s Digital Film Archive, this project empowers participants to explore new ideas and be more independent in their projects. The theme ‘Print isn’t Dead’ allows each person to explore their personal and community histories through archival film footage and create art works that share this with the wider public. 

We have seen a transforming effect on participants mental health in the workshop and via their feedback in their everyday life. Print Isn’t Dead builds on our previous programmes by empowering participants to explore new ideas and be more independent in their projects. 

Using letterpress and photo plate printing and delving into archives, conversations, research and contemporary documentation we will chart some of the significant events and stories of Bangor, a popular seaside town from the point of view of these residents who have been isolated through illness and life challenges.

The featured body of work was created by residents of the Samuel Kelly Care Home as they responded to old family films set in Portrush and Bangor Town Centres. From revisiting dances and outdoor festivities, the participants felt particularly inspired by the way in which the clothes moved with the dancers. This was then fed into their work through fleeting brushstrokes and letterpress text. 

Sharing your story can have a powerful effect and we’ll facilitate this sharing in partnership with the County Down Spectator. We’re working on a longer project that will allow us to open up fascinating letterpress collections and artefacts and printing machines. Currently our members are working toward creating a body of work inspired by WWII footage from the digital film archive.

The theme ‘Print isn’t Dead’ allows each person to explore their personal and community histories and create art works that share this with the wider public. Using archives, conversations, research and contemporary documentation we will chart some of the significant events and stories of Bangor, a popular seaside town from the point of view of these residents who have been isolated through illness and life challenges

If you would like to find out more about the archive and perhaps use it to inspire your own artwork then head on over to Digital Film Archive HERE. There are many sub-categories for you to browse through, and you may even recognise a few locations from your own personal history. 

If you would like to find out more about the project or are interested in collaborating with Seacourt at a community level then please don’t hesitate to contact our director, Emma Drury. 

Share this page: 

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email